Aclaran que incendio forestal en Ollantaytambo fue controlado

 
06 July 2017

published by http://www.diariodelcusco.com


Peru - El Coordinador del Parque Arqueológico de Ollantaytambo, Zenobio Valencia, informó que con la participación de 40 bomberos forestales de la Dirección Desconcentrada de Cultura de Cusco y el apoyo de otras instituciones, se logró sofocar un incendio forestal registrado en el sector de Pachar, distrito de Ollantaytambo.

El siniestro se generó en horas de la mañana del martes 4 de julio, en la margen izquierda del río Vilcanota, y se propagó hacia la parte alta en forma rápida, por acción de los vientos que habitualmente se registran en la zona.

Las lenguas de fuego arrasaron arbustos y pajonales, y también afectaron la vegetación que rodeaba a un pequeño tramo del camino prehispánico que comunica los sitios arqueológicos de Perolniyoc y Choccana.

Los bomberos forestales de la entidad cultural, convocados de los parques arqueológicos de Ollantaytambo, Urubamba y Saqsaywaman, junto a los bomberos y personal de Serenazgo de la Municipalidad Distrital de Ollantaytambo, lograron sofocar el incendio al mediodía del miércoles 5 de julio.

Se calcula que el incendio forestal afectó más de 250 hectáreas de arbustos, pastos naturales y pajonales del sector de Pachar, que está ubicado en la zona de amortiguamiento del Parque Arqueológico de Ollantaytambo.

La Policía Nacional del Perú (PNP) informó que el incendio forestal se registró en el sector Choqana del cerro Puertochayoq, el cual afortunadamente fue sofocado. El fuego consumió pastos silvestres, árboles pequeños propios del lugar y según confirmaron, no afectó parte de la andenería Inca que está alejada. No obstante, el lugar del siniestro es área protegida por el Estado, en cumplimiento a la Ley N° 28296.

English version of the news. Note: the news has been translated by Google translator.

They clarify that forest fire in Ollantaytambo was controlled

The Coordinator of the Archaeological Park of Ollantaytambo, Zenobio Valencia, reported that with the participation of 40 forest firefighters from the Decentralized Department of Culture of Cusco and the support of other institutions, a forest fire was registered in the sector of Pachar, district of Ollantaytambo.

The incident was generated in the morning hours of Tuesday, July 4, on the left bank of the Vilcanota River, and spread quickly to the upper part, thanks to the winds that are usually recorded in the area.

The tongues of fire swept shrubs and grasslands, and also affected the vegetation surrounding a small section of the pre-Hispanic road that connects the archaeological sites of Perolniyoc and Choccana.

The forest firefighters of the cultural entity, summoned from the archaeological parks of Ollantaytambo, Urubamba and Saqsaywaman, along with the firemen and personnel of Serenazgo of the Municipality District of Ollantaytambo, managed to put down the fire at noon of Wednesday 5 of July.

It is estimated that the forest fire affected more than 250 hectares of shrubs, natural pastures and pastures of the Pachar sector, which is located in the buffer zone of the Ollantaytambo Archaeological Park.

The National Police of Peru (PNP) reported that the forest fire was recorded in the Choqana sector of Cerro Puertochayoq, which fortunately was smothered. The fire consumed wild pastures, small trees typical of the place and as confirmed, did not affect part of the Inca andeneria that is far away. However, the place of the incident is an area protected by the State, in compliance with Law No. 28296.

It's been a fairly wet spring and summer this year, but when it gets dry for weeks at a time, the New York State Forest Rangers keep a close watch on forest fire danger in the Adirondacks.

In the early 1900s, fires ravaged thousands of acres of forest land in the Adirondack Park, particularly along railroad corridors. It caused alarm in Albany. The old system, created when the Forest Preserve was formed in 1885, wasn't working.

A new approach was needed, so the New York Legislature enacted new laws in 1909 to fight fires in the Adirondacks and Catskills. It was a game-changing moment, one that would lead to the establishment of the Forest Ranger Division in 1912 and the construction of more than 100 fire towers.

It's been a fairly wet spring and summer this year, but when it gets dry for weeks at a time, the New York State Forest Rangers keep a close watch on forest fire danger in the Adirondacks. In the early 1900s, fires ravaged thousands of acres of forest land in the Adirondack Park, particularly along railroad corridors. It caused alarm in Albany. The old system, created when the Forest Preserve was formed in 1885, wasn't working. A new approach was needed, so the New York Legislature enacted new laws in 1909 to fight fires in the Adirondacks and Catskills. It was a game-changing moment, one that would lead to the establishment of the Forest Ranger Division in 1912 and the construction of more than 100 fire towers.

It's been a fairly wet spring and summer this year, but when it gets dry for weeks at a time, the New York State Forest Rangers keep a close watch on forest fire danger in the Adirondacks.

In the early 1900s, fires ravaged thousands of acres of forest land in the Adirondack Park, particularly along railroad corridors. It caused alarm in Albany. The old system, created when the Forest Preserve was formed in 1885, wasn't working.

A new approach was needed, so the New York Legislature enacted new laws in 1909 to fight fires in the Adirondacks and Catskills. It was a game-changing moment, one that would lead to the establishment of the Forest Ranger Division in 1912 and the construction of more than 100 fire towers.

It's been a fairly wet spring and summer this year, but when it gets dry for weeks at a time, the New York State Forest Rangers keep a close watch on forest fire danger in the Adirondacks. In the early 1900s, fires ravaged thousands of acres of forest land in the Adirondack Park, particularly along railroad corridors. It caused alarm in Albany. The old system, created when the Forest Preserve was formed in 1885, wasn't working. A new approach was needed, so the New York Legislature enacted new laws in 1909 to fight fires in the Adirondacks and Catskills. It was a game-changing moment, one that would lead to the establishment of the Forest Ranger Division in 1912 and the construction of more than 100 fire towers.

The forest fire, which started on the night of June 24 and still smoldering in Spain's southwestern region of Huelva, burned a total of 8,486 hectares, the Andalusian Regional Government said on Wednesday. Environmental spokesman for Andalusia, Jose Fiscal, confirmed the damage on his Twitter account. Over 2,000 people had had to be evacuated from hotels and campsites on the perimeter of the fire, he said. He added that the perimeter established around the fire was actually 10,900 hectares, but within that perimeter, 2,414 hectares of woodland were still intact. The fire damaged two protected areas: 6,761 hectares of Donana National Park, which has UNESCO protected status and is home to around 400 different species such as the threatened Iberian Lynx and Iberian Eagle, and 17 hectares of Laguna de Palos y Madres Nature Park. The Andalusian government believed that had it not been for the work of fire fighters, who at the height of the blaze numbered around 500, the damage would have been far worse for the 43,225 hectares of woods and scrubland. According to the regional government, temperatures were around 40 degrees Celsius when the fire began, with a wind-speed of between 30 and 40 km per hour (km/h) and gusts of up to 90 km/h at night, which helped propagate the flames and made it impossible to use aircraft or helicopters to fight the fire. A total of 50 firemen remain in the zone to continue the work of damping down and to ensure there are no flare ups, while investigations continue into the cause of the blaze. Authorities have not ruled out a human cause.
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Tropical peat swamp forests, which once occupied large swaths of Southeast Asia and other areas, provided a significant "sink" that helped remove carbon dioxide from the atmosphere. But such forests have been disappearing fast due to clear-cutting and drainage projects making way for plantations. Now, research shows peatlands face another threat, as climate change alters rainfall patterns, potentially destroying even forested peatlands that remain undrained.

Read more at: https://phys.org/news/2017-06-peatlands-dwindling-losses.html#jCp
Tropical peat swamp forests, which once occupied large swaths of Southeast Asia and other areas, provided a significant "sink" that helped remove carbon dioxide from the atmosphere. But such forests have been disappearing fast due to clear-cutting and drainage projects making way for plantations. Now, research shows peatlands face another threat, as climate change alters rainfall patterns, potentially destroying even forested peatlands that remain undrained.

Read more at: https://phys.org/news/2017-06-peatlands-dwindling-losses.html#jCp