Se van a Canadá 108 mexicanos para combatir incendios

 
03 August 2017

published by http://www.excelsior.com.mx


Canada / Mexico - Para controlar el incendio forestal que desde hace dos semanas se combate en la comunidad de British Columbia, en Canadá, 108 brigadistas mexicanos de la Comisión Nacional Forestal (Conafor) viajarán hoy a esa nación para brindar su apoyo durante un mes.

De acuerdo con la Comisión, los combatientes mexicanos formarán cinco brigadas con 21 integrantes y junto con técnicos internacionales ayudarán en las labores para suprimir los 50 incendios que han afectado 379 mil 199 hectáreas en esa localidad canadiense.

“Los combatientes y los técnicos son embajadores de nuestro país y podemos sentirnos orgullosos como sociedad mexicana de tener este tipo de personas capacitadas y entrenadas y que pueden apoyar en el combate de incendios forestales”, afirmó el gerente de Manejo de Fuego de la Conafor, Alfredo Nolasco.

A través de un comunicado, la Comisión indicó que una vez que los connacionales arriben a Canadá se integrarán al Sistema de Mando de Incidentes (SMI) “e ingresarán a los protocolos internacionales de la Comisión Forestal para América del Norte (Cofan)”.

La Conafor destacó además que este tipo de acciones ya se han llevado a cabo con anterioridad como sucedió en junio de 2016, 42 brigadistas mexicanas ayudaron a enfrentar incendios en Canadá; también en enero de 2017, cuando 58 brigadistas mexicanos combatieron incendios en Chile.

English version of the news. Note: the news has been translated by Google translator.

108 Mexicans go to Canada to fight fires

To control the forest fires that have been fought in the community of British Columbia in Canada for two weeks, 108 Mexican brigaders from the National Forestry Commission (Conafor) will travel to that nation today to provide support for a month.

According to the Commission, the Mexican combatants will form five brigades with 21 members and along with international technicians will help in the work to suppress the 50 fires that have affected 379 thousand 199 hectares in that Canadian locality.

"The combatants and technicians are ambassadors of our country and we can feel proud as a Mexican society to have these kind of trained and trained people who can support in the fight against forest fires," said Conafor's manager of Fire Management, Alfredo Nolasco.

Through a communiqué, the Commission indicated that once nationals arrive in Canada, they will be integrated into the Incident Command System (SMI) "and will join the international protocols of the North American Forestry Commission (Cofan)."

The Conafor also emphasized that this type of actions have already been carried out previously as happened in June of 2016, 42 Mexican brigadistas helped to face fires in Canada; Also in January 2017, when 58 Mexican brigade fighters fought in Chile.

An international team of climate researchers from the US, South Korea and the UK has developed a new wildfire and drought prediction model for southwestern North America. Extending far beyond the current seasonal forecast, this study published in the journal Scientific Reports could benefit the economies with a variety of applications in agriculture, water management and forestry.

Over the past 15 years, California and neighboring regions have experienced heightened conditions and an increase in numbers with considerable impacts on human livelihoods, agriculture, and terrestrial ecosystems. This new research shows that in addition to a discernible contribution from natural forcings and human-induced global warming, the large-scale difference between Atlantic and Pacific ocean temperatures plays a fundamental role in causing droughts, and enhancing wildfire risks.

"Our results document that a combination of processes is at work. Through an ensemble modeling approach, we were able to show that without anthropogenic effects, the droughts in the southwestern United States would have been less severe," says co-author Axel Timmermann, Director of the newly founded IBS Center for Climate Physics, within the Institute for Basics Science (IBS), and Distinguished Professor at Pusan National University in South Korea. "By prescribing the effects of man-made climate change and observed global ocean temperatures, our model can reproduce the observed shifts in weather patterns and wildfire occurrences."



Read more at: https://phys.org/news/2017-07-atlanticpacific-ocean-temperature-difference-fuels.html#jCp
An international team of climate researchers from the US, South Korea and the UK has developed a new wildfire and drought prediction model for southwestern North America. Extending far beyond the current seasonal forecast, this study published in the journal Scientific Reports could benefit the economies with a variety of applications in agriculture, water management and forestry.
 

Over the past 15 years, California and neighboring regions have experienced heightened conditions and an increase in numbers with considerable impacts on human livelihoods, agriculture, and terrestrial ecosystems. This new research shows that in addition to a discernible contribution from natural forcings and human-induced global warming, the large-scale difference between Atlantic and Pacific ocean temperatures plays a fundamental role in causing droughts, and enhancing wildfire risks.

"Our results document that a combination of processes is at work. Through an ensemble modeling approach, we were able to show that without anthropogenic effects, the droughts in the southwestern United States would have been less severe," says co-author Axel Timmermann, Director of the newly founded IBS Center for Climate Physics, within the Institute for Basics Science (IBS), and Distinguished Professor at Pusan National University in South Korea. "By prescribing the effects of man-made climate change and observed global ocean temperatures, our model can reproduce the observed shifts in weather patterns and wildfire occurrences."



Read more at: https://phys.org/news/2017-07-atlanticpacific-ocean-temperature-difference-fuels.html#jCp