Russia sends fire helicopter to Serbia


 
03 August 2017

published by https://www.airmedandrescue.com


Serbia / Russia - An Mi-8 firefighting helicopter owned by the Russian Emergency Control Ministry (EMERCOM) has flown from Moscow, Russia, for deployment in Nis, Serbia, the service has announced. The move followed a request made by the Serbian government, said EMERCOM, as the risk of fire in the country has increased due to hot weather.

The helicopter, with a crew from the Zhukovsky Air Rescue Centre, are on round-the-clock duty at an airfield in Nis. The Mi-8 will respond to large fires in Serbia and the Balkans, said EMERCOM. The helicopter boasts water dropping equipment along with a rescue hoist.

EMERCOM noted that the Russian and Serbian governments signed an agreement to create a Russian-Serbian Humanitarian Centre in April 2012: “It is designated to ensure faster response to emergency situations happening in Serbia and other countries of the region, namely by search and rescue operations, humanitarian operations and fire suppression as one of the most important tasks ensuring protection of people and territories.”

The helicopter’s crew have a wealth of experience, said the Ministry. For example, the captain, 1st-class pilot Vladimir Seryshev, has taken part in many humanitarian and rescue operations, such as suppression of wildfires in the Nizhny Novgorod and Kirov Regions, battled a large fire in ammunition depots in the Saratov Region, and searched for missing persons including tourists, said the service.

An international team of climate researchers from the US, South Korea and the UK has developed a new wildfire and drought prediction model for southwestern North America. Extending far beyond the current seasonal forecast, this study published in the journal Scientific Reports could benefit the economies with a variety of applications in agriculture, water management and forestry.

Over the past 15 years, California and neighboring regions have experienced heightened conditions and an increase in numbers with considerable impacts on human livelihoods, agriculture, and terrestrial ecosystems. This new research shows that in addition to a discernible contribution from natural forcings and human-induced global warming, the large-scale difference between Atlantic and Pacific ocean temperatures plays a fundamental role in causing droughts, and enhancing wildfire risks.

"Our results document that a combination of processes is at work. Through an ensemble modeling approach, we were able to show that without anthropogenic effects, the droughts in the southwestern United States would have been less severe," says co-author Axel Timmermann, Director of the newly founded IBS Center for Climate Physics, within the Institute for Basics Science (IBS), and Distinguished Professor at Pusan National University in South Korea. "By prescribing the effects of man-made climate change and observed global ocean temperatures, our model can reproduce the observed shifts in weather patterns and wildfire occurrences."



Read more at: https://phys.org/news/2017-07-atlanticpacific-ocean-temperature-difference-fuels.html#jCp
An international team of climate researchers from the US, South Korea and the UK has developed a new wildfire and drought prediction model for southwestern North America. Extending far beyond the current seasonal forecast, this study published in the journal Scientific Reports could benefit the economies with a variety of applications in agriculture, water management and forestry.
 

Over the past 15 years, California and neighboring regions have experienced heightened conditions and an increase in numbers with considerable impacts on human livelihoods, agriculture, and terrestrial ecosystems. This new research shows that in addition to a discernible contribution from natural forcings and human-induced global warming, the large-scale difference between Atlantic and Pacific ocean temperatures plays a fundamental role in causing droughts, and enhancing wildfire risks.

"Our results document that a combination of processes is at work. Through an ensemble modeling approach, we were able to show that without anthropogenic effects, the droughts in the southwestern United States would have been less severe," says co-author Axel Timmermann, Director of the newly founded IBS Center for Climate Physics, within the Institute for Basics Science (IBS), and Distinguished Professor at Pusan National University in South Korea. "By prescribing the effects of man-made climate change and observed global ocean temperatures, our model can reproduce the observed shifts in weather patterns and wildfire occurrences."



Read more at: https://phys.org/news/2017-07-atlanticpacific-ocean-temperature-difference-fuels.html#jCp