10 more fire stations for Sabah in next five years


 
05 August 2017

published by http://www.theborneopost.com


Malaysia - KOTA KINABALU: Ten fire stations are expected to be built in Sabah within the next five years.

Disclosing this here yesterday, Malaysia Fire and Rescue Director General Datuk Wan Mohd Nor Hj Ibrahim said there were plans to build 10 more fire stations in the state in the next five years.

“Currently there are 21 fire stations in Sabah, plus four more which are under construction and should be completed within this year and next year.

“If everything goes as planned, we will have 10 more fire stations in Sabah by 2021,” he said.

Wan Mohd Nor said this in a press conference after presenting awards and certificates to 12 Fire and Rescue Department officers and personnel, and 12 Fire and Rescue officers who would be retiring at the state Fire and Rescue Department Headquarters in Kolombong, here yesterday.

Also present were Sabah Fire and Rescue Department director Nordin Pauzi and Sabah Fire and Rescue Department deputy director Zuraidah Latip.

When asked on the status of the four additional fire stations under construction, namely in Beluran, Kimanis, Sook and Pitas, Wan Mohd Nor said two of the stations were expected to be in operation by end of this year.

“The Beluran fire station is about 95 percent completed while Kimanis is not far behind at 93 percent.

“For Sook and Pitas, both stations have just started construction and are between 15 percent and 10 percent completed respectively,” he said, adding that both the stations were expected to be completed by September next year.

When asked about the drought situation in the state, Nordin said the department had not received many calls as it was still at its earlier stage.

“We will be expecting lots of call within the next several weeks leading to the drought situation where there will be many bush fires.

“Actually, I made an announcement in a local radio recently on ways the public can help the department in preventing fire from happening in the first place.

“One way is to stop open burning, or if there is a need to burn rubbish then control the flame, inform the Fire and Rescue Department of any bush fire immediately so we can contain it immediately,” he said.

An international team of climate researchers from the US, South Korea and the UK has developed a new wildfire and drought prediction model for southwestern North America. Extending far beyond the current seasonal forecast, this study published in the journal Scientific Reports could benefit the economies with a variety of applications in agriculture, water management and forestry.

Over the past 15 years, California and neighboring regions have experienced heightened conditions and an increase in numbers with considerable impacts on human livelihoods, agriculture, and terrestrial ecosystems. This new research shows that in addition to a discernible contribution from natural forcings and human-induced global warming, the large-scale difference between Atlantic and Pacific ocean temperatures plays a fundamental role in causing droughts, and enhancing wildfire risks.

"Our results document that a combination of processes is at work. Through an ensemble modeling approach, we were able to show that without anthropogenic effects, the droughts in the southwestern United States would have been less severe," says co-author Axel Timmermann, Director of the newly founded IBS Center for Climate Physics, within the Institute for Basics Science (IBS), and Distinguished Professor at Pusan National University in South Korea. "By prescribing the effects of man-made climate change and observed global ocean temperatures, our model can reproduce the observed shifts in weather patterns and wildfire occurrences."



Read more at: https://phys.org/news/2017-07-atlanticpacific-ocean-temperature-difference-fuels.html#jCp
An international team of climate researchers from the US, South Korea and the UK has developed a new wildfire and drought prediction model for southwestern North America. Extending far beyond the current seasonal forecast, this study published in the journal Scientific Reports could benefit the economies with a variety of applications in agriculture, water management and forestry.
 

Over the past 15 years, California and neighboring regions have experienced heightened conditions and an increase in numbers with considerable impacts on human livelihoods, agriculture, and terrestrial ecosystems. This new research shows that in addition to a discernible contribution from natural forcings and human-induced global warming, the large-scale difference between Atlantic and Pacific ocean temperatures plays a fundamental role in causing droughts, and enhancing wildfire risks.

"Our results document that a combination of processes is at work. Through an ensemble modeling approach, we were able to show that without anthropogenic effects, the droughts in the southwestern United States would have been less severe," says co-author Axel Timmermann, Director of the newly founded IBS Center for Climate Physics, within the Institute for Basics Science (IBS), and Distinguished Professor at Pusan National University in South Korea. "By prescribing the effects of man-made climate change and observed global ocean temperatures, our model can reproduce the observed shifts in weather patterns and wildfire occurrences."



Read more at: https://phys.org/news/2017-07-atlanticpacific-ocean-temperature-difference-fuels.html#jCp