Four million farmers to benefit from technology centres


 
06 August 2017

published by http://citifmonline.com


Ghana - Over four million farmers nationwide are expected to benefit from the creation of the District Centre of Agriculture, Commerce and Technology (DCACT) by the Akufo-Addo government.

According to the Deputy Minister of Local Government and Rural Development in charge of Economic and Development, Collins Ntim, the farmers will be supported with improved seedlings and equipment to work and improve livelihoods in the country.

In an interview with Citi News the Deputy Minister, who is also the member of Parliament for Offinso North indicated that the establishment of the centre will create a smooth relationship between the private and public investors and industry players.

“This unit when created will serve as a one stop centre within the district, an interface between the public and the private sector for a friendly partnership. A database will be created at the service centre which will have all the details of farmers and the types of farm produce their into for easy access for investors to go through and see how they are faring. This will also help us to monitor the kind of logistics, equipment in our distribution and disbursement of things to the farmers”

He added that 200 youth will be trained in every district in fire prevention to complement the work of the farmers to avoid bush fires which is a major threat to the project Planting for Jobs and Investments.
He then urged DCEs to collaborate with Agric officers and farmers in their districts to position their to attract investors which will be used to assess their performance stating that an award will be given to the best DCE on farmers day celebration.

He said, “I must say the DCEs do not have any option than to perform because their work is going to be judged on this, at the end of the day we will review what they have done and know how many farmers have benefited, how many investors have been brought on board. So the DCEs should work very closely with the district agricultural officers and farmers in their respective districts to be able to position themselves well to attract investors”

He added, “at the next farmers day it is not only farmers who will be recognized and awarded but the ministry is also making arrangements to award the best DCE who will be able to help his district.”

An international team of climate researchers from the US, South Korea and the UK has developed a new wildfire and drought prediction model for southwestern North America. Extending far beyond the current seasonal forecast, this study published in the journal Scientific Reports could benefit the economies with a variety of applications in agriculture, water management and forestry.

Over the past 15 years, California and neighboring regions have experienced heightened conditions and an increase in numbers with considerable impacts on human livelihoods, agriculture, and terrestrial ecosystems. This new research shows that in addition to a discernible contribution from natural forcings and human-induced global warming, the large-scale difference between Atlantic and Pacific ocean temperatures plays a fundamental role in causing droughts, and enhancing wildfire risks.

"Our results document that a combination of processes is at work. Through an ensemble modeling approach, we were able to show that without anthropogenic effects, the droughts in the southwestern United States would have been less severe," says co-author Axel Timmermann, Director of the newly founded IBS Center for Climate Physics, within the Institute for Basics Science (IBS), and Distinguished Professor at Pusan National University in South Korea. "By prescribing the effects of man-made climate change and observed global ocean temperatures, our model can reproduce the observed shifts in weather patterns and wildfire occurrences."



Read more at: https://phys.org/news/2017-07-atlanticpacific-ocean-temperature-difference-fuels.html#jCp
An international team of climate researchers from the US, South Korea and the UK has developed a new wildfire and drought prediction model for southwestern North America. Extending far beyond the current seasonal forecast, this study published in the journal Scientific Reports could benefit the economies with a variety of applications in agriculture, water management and forestry.
 

Over the past 15 years, California and neighboring regions have experienced heightened conditions and an increase in numbers with considerable impacts on human livelihoods, agriculture, and terrestrial ecosystems. This new research shows that in addition to a discernible contribution from natural forcings and human-induced global warming, the large-scale difference between Atlantic and Pacific ocean temperatures plays a fundamental role in causing droughts, and enhancing wildfire risks.

"Our results document that a combination of processes is at work. Through an ensemble modeling approach, we were able to show that without anthropogenic effects, the droughts in the southwestern United States would have been less severe," says co-author Axel Timmermann, Director of the newly founded IBS Center for Climate Physics, within the Institute for Basics Science (IBS), and Distinguished Professor at Pusan National University in South Korea. "By prescribing the effects of man-made climate change and observed global ocean temperatures, our model can reproduce the observed shifts in weather patterns and wildfire occurrences."



Read more at: https://phys.org/news/2017-07-atlanticpacific-ocean-temperature-difference-fuels.html#jCp