Rescatan a oso de anteojos luego de incendio forestal en Machu Picchu


 
06 August 2017

published by http://rpp.pe


Peru - Un oso de anteojos fue rescatado por los guardaparques del Servicio Nacional de Áreas Naturales Protegidas por el Estado (Sernanp), luego de registrarse el incendio forestal en la quebrada Aobamba, ubicado en el distrito de Machu Picchu, provincia cusqueña de Urubamba.

El animal de aproximadamente 8 meses de nacido se salvó del incendio. Sin embargo, Sernanp informó que pequeño oso carece de habilidades para sobrevivir y no puede alcanzar y desojar sus alimentos.

Habitad natural. Los guardaparques del área protegida monitorean al animal hasta asegurar su completa reinserción a su habitad natural. Como parte de este proceso se realizarán las coordinaciones con el Ministerio de Cultura, a fin de evitar que los visitantes a la montaña de Machu Picchu le brinden alimentos.

El oso de anteojos es una de las especies más emblemáticas de todo el santuario natural de Machu Picchu.

English version of the news. Note: the news has been translated by Google translator.

Rescue of spectacled bear after forest fire in Machu Picchu

A spectacled bear was rescued by the rangers of the National Service of Natural Areas Protected by the State (Sernanp), after registering the forest fire in the Aobamba gorge, located in the district of Machu Picchu, province of Cusco Urubamba.

The animal about 8 months old was saved from the fire. However, Sernanp reported that little bear lacks the skills to survive and can not reach and defrost his food.

Natural habitat. The rangers of the protected area monitor the animal to ensure its complete reinsertion to its natural habitat. As part of this process, coordinations will be carried out with the Ministry of Culture, in order to prevent visitors to the mountain of Machu Picchu from providing food.

The spectacled bear is one of the most emblematic species in the entire natural sanctuary of Machu Picchu.

An international team of climate researchers from the US, South Korea and the UK has developed a new wildfire and drought prediction model for southwestern North America. Extending far beyond the current seasonal forecast, this study published in the journal Scientific Reports could benefit the economies with a variety of applications in agriculture, water management and forestry.

Over the past 15 years, California and neighboring regions have experienced heightened conditions and an increase in numbers with considerable impacts on human livelihoods, agriculture, and terrestrial ecosystems. This new research shows that in addition to a discernible contribution from natural forcings and human-induced global warming, the large-scale difference between Atlantic and Pacific ocean temperatures plays a fundamental role in causing droughts, and enhancing wildfire risks.

"Our results document that a combination of processes is at work. Through an ensemble modeling approach, we were able to show that without anthropogenic effects, the droughts in the southwestern United States would have been less severe," says co-author Axel Timmermann, Director of the newly founded IBS Center for Climate Physics, within the Institute for Basics Science (IBS), and Distinguished Professor at Pusan National University in South Korea. "By prescribing the effects of man-made climate change and observed global ocean temperatures, our model can reproduce the observed shifts in weather patterns and wildfire occurrences."



Read more at: https://phys.org/news/2017-07-atlanticpacific-ocean-temperature-difference-fuels.html#jCp
An international team of climate researchers from the US, South Korea and the UK has developed a new wildfire and drought prediction model for southwestern North America. Extending far beyond the current seasonal forecast, this study published in the journal Scientific Reports could benefit the economies with a variety of applications in agriculture, water management and forestry.
 

Over the past 15 years, California and neighboring regions have experienced heightened conditions and an increase in numbers with considerable impacts on human livelihoods, agriculture, and terrestrial ecosystems. This new research shows that in addition to a discernible contribution from natural forcings and human-induced global warming, the large-scale difference between Atlantic and Pacific ocean temperatures plays a fundamental role in causing droughts, and enhancing wildfire risks.

"Our results document that a combination of processes is at work. Through an ensemble modeling approach, we were able to show that without anthropogenic effects, the droughts in the southwestern United States would have been less severe," says co-author Axel Timmermann, Director of the newly founded IBS Center for Climate Physics, within the Institute for Basics Science (IBS), and Distinguished Professor at Pusan National University in South Korea. "By prescribing the effects of man-made climate change and observed global ocean temperatures, our model can reproduce the observed shifts in weather patterns and wildfire occurrences."



Read more at: https://phys.org/news/2017-07-atlanticpacific-ocean-temperature-difference-fuels.html#jCp